H. J. Heinz Memorial Plaza, Sharpsburg

H. J. Heinz started his business in Sharpsburg, and he gave this plaza in the center of the town as a token of his gratitude. The bronze reliefs are by the notable sculptor Emil Fuchs. The main section of the top panel is an allegory of Industry; the main part of the lower panel shows H. J. Heinz himself teaching Sunday school at Grace Methodist Church.

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The statue of an Indian, always identified as Guyasuta, is a duplicate of a duplicate. Heinz gave the town a splendid fountain, which was knocked down by a car in the 1930s. The statue of Guyasuta was replaced from the original molds, but that replacement was run over by a truck in the 1980s. This current incarnation has not been smashed yet.

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Camera: Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3.

Edward Manning Bigelow

Giuseppe Moretti’s statue of Edward Manning Bigelow stands at the entrance to Schenley Park in Oakland. It was Mr. Bigelow’s persuasive ability that gave us Schenley Park, which was created from the land that had belonged to Mary Schenley, heir to the O’Hara glass fortune; she had left Pittsburgh and was living in England, where Mr. Bigelow went to see her. He fought hard for a park here, a woodland oasis in the middle of the rapidly expanding city, though powerful interests wanted the land for more urban development. Mr. Bigelow also planned several of the broad boulevards that meander through the eastern part of the city: Beechwood Boulevard, Washington Boulevard, and Grant Boulevard, which after his death was renamed Bigelow Boulevard.

St. Michael the Archangel Church, Munhall

This Slovak church is no longer used, but the building is still kept in good condition.

The Romanesque façade, with its colorful inlays, is something extraordinary even in a region of extraordinary churches.

The relief of Ss. Cyril and Methodius, apostles to the Slavs, shows more than a little Art Deco influence.

Until a few years ago, the tower held up a fine statue of St. Joseph the Worker, one of the last major works of the great Frank Vittor. It has been moved to St. Maximilian Kolbe parish, where you can see it at eye level.

George Washington Memorial, Allegheny Commons

Sculptor Edward Ludwig Albert Pausch designed this equestrian statue, which was unveiled to great fanfare in 1891. It depicts young Colonel Washington, aged 23, as he appeared when he visited the future site of Pittsburgh and nearly drowned himself in the Allegheny. This is apparently known as Pausch’s masterpiece.

If you enlarge the photo above, you will notice that, at the upper right, the name of the Smith Granite Company comes before the sculptor’s name in the signature.

The monument was commissioned by the Junior Order of the United American Mechanics.